Random Animu-, Sketch- and Slife-of-Life-Blog

Montag, 12. April 2010

Making your own Anime

Habe heute ein interessantes Posting zum thema Anime-Produktion gefunden. Enjoy.

by terrydy

Yes, making animated short is kind of difficult, especially when working solo. All the things mentioned below are assumed that you have already finished the character design and have a ready-to-use color palette or swatches you can already use. I suggest using pencil, thin onion paper or animation paper, and a lightbox for tracing the artwork. This is normally a tradigital work flow. If you desire to do in this manner, then you should scan and feed the drawings into the computer frames by frames, mostly key frames. Also a automatic feed scanner is easier and faster to scan all those drawings. The in-betweens can be partially done or completely using digital methods. As for the background, you can either use traditional French Gouache or Acrylic paint and brush, and ink pen, and then scanning it into the computer at 300 dpi. Or you can directly work the background by digitally creating the layers and textures needed for each section of a background. Make sure the object that is painted has a transparent background and saved in .png file. Plan which texture and object layer will go where. (This can be done in Adobe Photoshop or Corel Painter with the correct brush settings respectively.) Then, importing into a 3D program such as Maya or Newtek Lightwave 3D, then create the 2D planes for the object layers(.png) or create simple volume of shapes to fit your need of the texture layers. Adjust the planes using XYZ axis to give the feel of depth. Then finally, render the background in a transparent file format with Photoshop layers for additional editing and reuse. Once it is rendered, the layers are preserved, and it is very easy to adjust the color of any layer to give the different time of the day effect. Also, save as a native 3D file as well, so you can replace old textures with new ones to fit the mood of certain factors, such as the weather changes from Sunny to Rainy and so on etc. As for the animation portion, if you like to use the tradigital method mentioned above, a graphics tablet is required as well to vector the scanned frames. But if you like a COMPLETELY DIGITAL WORK FLOW, you will probably be best off with a Wacom Cintiq 12″ which can handle nicely. If you got more cash, go for the 20″ or 21″, but I prefer 12″ which is more than enough to work with. Once you got the Cintiq, start sketching poses for the key frames with minimal details. Once you got enough keys for a scene, start to add details to each frames (this applies to tradigital method as well.) Once you finish all the key frames with all the details, you can start using onion skinning to draw in the in-betweens. Also automatic tweening in encouraged by me to give the overall animation a smooth transition between each in-betweens and the key frames. Next, we have the line testing[...]

Der Post geht noch weiter:
Source: http://www.hongfire.com/forum/showthread.php?t=140868&p=2180636

Freitag, 9. April 2010

Bleistiftzeichnung in Strichgraphik umwandeln

Das folgende Tutorial zeigt MEINE umgehensweise, eine eingescannte Bleistiftzeichnung in eine Strichgraphik in Photoshop umzuwandeln, um damit eventuell CGs zu erstellen. Die Begriffe beziehen sich auf die englische Version von Photoshop

Schritt 1: -Bild in Graustufen einscannen bei 300/600/1200 dpi, je höher desto besser
Schritt 2: -Bild in Photoshop öffnen, in Image->Mode und kontrollieren ob das Bild auf Grayscale ist
Schritt 3: -in Filter->Blur den gaussschen Weichzeichner/Blur auswählen und auf 0.5 stellen(die Bleistiftzeichnung sollte sehr sauber sein) und anwenden PS: dieser Schritt ist nicht unbedingt notwendig; ohne diesen können im Endprodukt kleinere Pixel entstehen, die sich überall auf dem Bild verteilen
Schritt 4: -Image->Adjustments->Curves , Einstellungen im Screen zu sehen

Schritt 5: -Image->Mode->Bitmap, die Auflösung kann so bleiben, bei Methode wählt ihr 50% Treshold(je weniger die %, desto mehr werden die Texturen beibehalten; habe allerdings noch keine Möglichkeit in Photoshop gefunden, die Werte zu ändern); in Illustrator geht es unter Object-> Live Trace-> Tracing Options
Schritt 6: -ist das Ergebnis gut, wechselt ihr den Modus wieder in Grayscale
Schritt 7: -wenn ihr das Bild nun colorieren wollt, den Modus in RGB umwandeln
Schritt 8: -Tee trinken^^